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The International Journal of Prosthodontics
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Int J Prosthodont 29 (2016), No. 1     12. Jan. 2016
Int J Prosthodont 29 (2016), No. 1  (12.01.2016)

Page 71-73, doi:10.11607/ijp.4287, PubMed:26757333


Photogrammetry Impression Technique: A Case History Report
Sánchez-Monescillo, Andrés / Sánchez-Turrion, Andrés / Vellon-Demarco, Elena / Salinas-Goodier, Carmen / Prados-Frutos, Juan Carlos
Purpose: The aim of this report is to present photogrammetry as a reliable step in the fabrication of a full-arch immediate rehabilitation.
Materials and Methods: A 59-yearold man attended the department seeking dental rehabilitation for the sequelae of severe oral health neglect. The mandibular teeth suffered from advanced periodontal disease and the patient wore a maxillary complete denture. An irreversible hydrocolloid impression of the mandibular arch was made, poured in stone, and digitally scanned to create the first stereolithography (STL) file. All teeth with the exception of two retained as landmarks were extracted, and seven implants were placed under local anesthesia and their positions recorded using photogrammetry. Maxillary and mandibular dental arch alginate impressions were made, poured in laboratory stone, and scanned. A provisional restoration was placed 7 hours after surgery using the STL files to determine the best-fit line.
Results: Radiographic and clinical follow-up after 1 year showed a favorable evolution of the implants. No screw loosening or other mechanical or biologic complications were observed.
Conclusion: The case history using the described system suggests certain advantages over conventional techniques. More research is needed to assess the possible benefits associated with photogrammetry when making implant-supported restorations.