The International Journal of Prosthodontics
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Int J Prosthodont 30 (2017), No. 5     8. Sep. 2017
Int J Prosthodont 30 (2017), No. 5  (08.09.2017)

Page 445-454, doi:10.11607/ijp.5151, PubMed:28806425


Impact of Different Surgeons on Dental Implant Failure
Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos / Kisch, Jenö / Albrektsson, Tomas / / Wennerberg, Ann
Purpose: To assess the influence of several factors on the prevalence of dental implant failure, with special consideration of the placement of implants by different dental surgeons.
Materials and Methods: This retrospective study is based on 2,670 patients who received 10,096 implants at one specialist clinic. Only the data of patients and implants treated by surgeons who had inserted a minimum of 200 implants at the clinic were included. Kaplan-Meier curves were stratified with respect to the individual surgeon. A generalized estimating equation (GEE) method was used to account for the fact that repeated observations (several implants) were placed in a single patient. The factors bone quantity, bone quality, implant location, implant surface, and implant system were analyzed with descriptive statistics separately for each individual surgeon.
Results: A total of 10 surgeons were eligible. The differences between the survival curves of each individual were statistically significant. The multivariate GEE model showed the following variables to be statistically significant: surgeon, bruxism, intake of antidepressants, location, implant length, and implant system. The surgeon with the highest absolute number of failures was also the one who inserted the most implants in sites of poor bone and used turned implants in most cases, whereas the surgeon with the lowest absolute number of failures used mainly modern implants. Separate survival analyses of turned and modern implants stratified for the individual surgeon showed statistically significant differences in cumulative survival.
Conclusion: Different levels of failure incidence could be observed between the surgeons, occasionally reaching significant levels. Although a direct causal relationship could not be ascertained, the results of the present study suggest that the surgeons' technique, skills, and/or judgment may negatively influence implant survival rates.
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